Prove your humanity


First-year university students often find it difficult to make friends, and network and later on find it hard to get a job even after getting a degree. During the orientation week, students are encouraged to join clubs at Curtin as it can help them make friends and network. University no-doubt is stressful and not having friends can make the whole experience more daunting. There are over 100 academic, special interest, religious issues-based, and international clubs at Curtin for students to join.

Special interest clubs include sports, music, gaming, and social events. Academic clubs help members develop networking and professional skills to suit a particular degree. There are clubs that are centered on promoting and advocating for a particular issue or political group and offer many opportunities to get involved with volunteering. International clubs run social events for international students so that they can make connections with people from home, but also for domestic students so that they can make friends and learn about different cultures. These clubs allow students to gather and practice the many religious, spiritual, and cultural traditions present at Curtin.

The clubs at Curtin are diverse as they all are a hub for learning. I personally feel students should try and join two clubs. One that suits their degree and one that will help them enjoy their time at university or learn something new like about the culture or share their opinions and thoughts. I recently joined the Desi society which helped me to meet students who are from the same region and culture and it helped me feel belonged. I met some amazing friends who share similar interests. I also joined the biomedical sciences club which aims to strengthen the relationships between the biomedical science disciplines, through social opportunities that allow our members to grow and build networks with professional organizations by partnering with various organizations. It has helped me immensely with networking and getting a good idea of the professional world.

I recently had the opportunity to talk to Cheyenne (one of the current contributing editors at Curtin) and here is what she has to say.

1. What degree are you studying for? 

I’m currently in my second year, studying a double major in Creative Writing and Japanese as a part of my Bachelor of Arts degree.”

2. What influenced you to join a club at Curtin and did you keep your degree in mind when joining a club?

“When I first started university, I applied for quite a few clubs. However, I found that I was a lot more engaged with Curtin Writers Club compared to the other ones I registered for. Not only were their events and practices related to my degree, but I was able to gain many opportunities to write stories, while also getting a lot of editing experience as well. Because of this, Curtin Writers Club is the only university club that I’m currently a member of.”

3. What do you like most about the club you joined?

What I personally enjoy about Curtin Writers Club is that there is always an opportunity to collaborate with others and gain industry knowledge, which is vital if you’re planning on pursuing a career in the creative writing or editing and publishing field.”

Joining a club is a great way to open new doors for the future and I think every student should try and get involved. It will help them meet friends and come across opportunities and gain experience.

Image Credit: Tabassum Ishra